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By West Norwood Therapies Team, Oct 28 2019 11:43AM

Osteopath and yoga teacher Yinka, aka #theosteopathyogi shares her experience of the journey in bringing yoga to West Norwood Therapies - how far we have come!


I have been an Osteopath for 27 years and have taught yoga for 20 years, gaining my Diploma with the British Wheel of Yoga in 2000. The regulated BWYQ Certificate and Diploma qualifications require level 4 attainment and are therefore equivalent to an HNC/ first year of a foundation Degree and is a 500 hours qualification. This is the highest level of yoga teacher training currently available in the UK.


I began teaching yoga to primary school teachers in Brixton, and this slowly evolved to include anyone who wanted to come along to my class. In January 2015 I was forced to give up the teaching space that I had used, given the cost of renting suitable space I thought that I would have a lengthy break from teaching, but I was wrong. In October 2014 West Norwood Therapies (WNT) was founded and I began offering osteopathic care in Room 1. Room 1 is quite large, and Jennie and I thought perhaps if we moved furniture and screened off part of the room, we could use the space for a class. On the 1st of February we ran a trial class, it went well, and I decided to go for it. With the support of the fantastic Women of the WNT team Yoga with Yinka at WNT was born. The first classes started on Wednesday 25th of February 2015. I was determined to make it work, arriving early to shift furniture, and hoovering afterwards (in those days we had carpet). The classes went from strength to strength and as word got around; in November 2017 I was able to start a class on Friday morning and at the beginning of this year I began a Thursday morning class as well.


My teaching style is relaxed, informative and tailored to suit those who prefer a smaller group setting. I build gradually to the fuller expression of the postures, modifying as necessary or required. There is a community supportive feel to the classes and many of the original Wednesday morning yogis still attend. Because of my teaching style, and the room space I run the classes on a 6-week block booking that runs parallel to the school term so that those caring for school age children can attend without missing out. The feedback I have had over the years has given me the confidence to take Yoga with Yinka into the NHS and at the beginning of May this year I began teaching yoga at a GP surgery. There are referral criteria and GP’s refer those they feel could benefit to the classes. Since 2015 the WNT team quickly realised that movement-based classes work well and we now have Emma who teaches Vinyasa flow, antenatal and restorative yoga, Hannah who teaches Qi Gong and Tai Chi and more recently Jenny who teaches Feldenkrais. We are soon to be joined by Laura reflexologist and yoga teacher.


Coming soon will be Yoga with Yinka workshops for low back pain and in the meantime, wherever you do your yoga, enjoy your practice.

Yinka aka #theosteopathyogi




By West Norwood Therapies Team, Apr 8 2019 03:04PM

Osteopath and yoga teacher Yinka Fabusuyi shares some thougths about 'wellness' - what it is and how we can take simple, attainable steps towards achieving it.



In 1948 the World Health Organisation defined health as ‘not merely the absence of disease or infirmity but a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being’. This sounds great, aspirational and perhaps impossible.


One approach might be to make small affordable, realistic changes over a sustained period to optimise mental physical and social health. Wellness might be about cutting down, exercising, scaling up, downsizing, recycling, repurposing, cleansing, purging or whatever you think will help you stay as fit and healthy as you can within your means. Wellness can be about addressing changes to your diet or exercise routines which you have always meant to get around to but never seem to have the time. Make a small change right now rather than waiting for the “ideal time”. Get off the bus, start a class, ring a friend, bake that cake, start that hobby. As a yoga teacher I often hear people say things like “I would love to do yoga but I am not flexible enough”. I say, find the right class for you (this may take several attempts), start slowly and gently, keep going and you will get more flexible with the side benefit of learning relaxation techniques, getting stronger and you might even sleep better.


Schools are including wellness in the curriculum and we are beginning to teach children that mental as well as physical health is important for wellbeing. In an ideal world all the resources we need would be freely available, but sadly this is becoming less and less common. I was very saddened not to be able to continue working as an osteopath within the NHS due to funding cuts, but perhaps a regular commitment to exercising, getting more sleep, and planning more leisure time to name a few examples could make a big difference to how well you feel, and decrease the chances of needing medical or other therapeutic intervention. If you do need some input I can help signpost what you could do to get back on track.


Start now, keep going and good luck. Yinka.



By West Norwood Therapies Team, Jan 25 2018 10:00AM

Osteopath and yoga teacher Yinka Fabusuyi shares some thoughts on her approach to her work and the subtle effects of yoga.


The recently ended festive season has been a good opportunity to meet new people and make contact with old friends. I was asked a few times over the party season what I did for a living, and I said I was an osteopath and a yoga teacher. As is often the case with the start of a new year, I have been doing some thinking about my work. Osteopathy and yoga for me are about working with the whole person and I am interested in what people do with their bodies on a day to day basis, and how this may have some bearing on what has brought them to me. This patient centred approach addresses stress points (physical and mental) by helping people to see the connection between the two, and coming up with a tailor made treatment strategy.


My osteopathic treatment involves helping to decrease pain, improving mobility, supporting people through exercise and recovery from injury or surgery and signposting things that may be of additional help. The pathway of care starts with a discussion, and moves onto observation and examination. This is followed by a joint agreement to proceed with hands-on treatment. My approach to yoga has some overlapping features including using my observational skills to modify and adapt my small group classes for the needs of the individual. I aim to allow all who have come along to participate fully. This can sometimes mean doing things a little differently, going slowly, changing the pace of the class, and modifying techniques or postures.


This can have unexpected benefits, for example I was really touched when a new comer to my yoga class told me that she had been able to run up the stairs for the first time in ages with no problem. She said “All due to yoga– 20 years of gym work have not achieved this!” Resolving to exercise can involve all forms of strengthening and conditioning, osteopathic treatment and yoga, whilst not for everyone might be what your body needs.


Yinka Fabusuyi

Osteopath and Yoga teacher.




By West Norwood Therapies Team, May 24 2017 08:00AM

Osteopath and yoga teacher Yinka Fabusuyi considers how gardening can give you some good exercise out in the fresh air at this time of year


Fresh air and exercise is for many people a great combination. Gardening is fantastic exercise and gets you out. Some gardening tasks are strenuous or require repetitive movement through the joints. Whilst most people will feel a little stiff and achy after a stint of gardening which quickly passes, others may find that they have prolonged pain in the lower back, knees or other joints. Osteopathy has a lot to offer. Treatment can reduce pain, improve mobility and get you on the road to recovery. As well as giving you advice and exercises which may reduce the chances of recurrence, my consultations allow time to explore your symptoms, offer treatment, and discuss ways forward.


The human body is strong and designed for movement, however there are some things to encourage, and things to avoid when gardening if possible.


1. When lifting heavy weights bend your knees and keep the weight close to your body in order to decrease leverage through the spine and joints of the arms.


2. Vary your gardening tasks to avoid overuse strains on your neck, back and shoulders.


3. Consider having raised beds made if you have chronic lower back pain.


4. Use mulch on bare patches of soil to discourage weed growth which adds more labour to your gardening tasks.


5. When using a spade or large fork, lean your whole body weight down through the handle rather than thrusting with your shoulders and back.


6. Keep your garden tools in good repair. Keep shears and secateurs sharp and get loose handles repaired to reduce strain to your back, wrists or shoulders. Independent garden centres sometimes offer a tool sharpening service. (My local one does).


Have a fruitful summer.


Yinka Fabusuyi




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