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By West Norwood Therapies Team, Jul 18 2019 08:34AM

Yoga teacher Emma Klein is running a restorative yoga retreat in Hampshire in October:


Come rest and restore with me on an amazing weekend retreat in Hampshire. This retreat will be held at the beautiful lodge at Riverside Lifestyle and across the weekend you will have plenty of time for contemplation, the chance to eat great organic meals and lots of yoga.



Friday: Arrival after 5pm, dinner and Yoga Nidra.


Saturday: Morning Dynamic Flow Yoga Class, Breakfast, Pranayama Workshop, Lunch, Free Time, Dinner, Restorative Yoga.


Sunday: Morning Dynamic Flow Yoga Class, Breakfast, Free Time, Lunch and return home.


Prices start from £350pp sharing. Mix of rooms with en suites and shared bathrooms. All rooms can be double or twin beds.


Book Now – go to the Yoga Flo-ga Shop (www.yogafloga.com/shop) or contact me via email (info@yogafloga.com).


Tickets via the website have a PayPal surcharge, or pay via bank transfer for no extra cost. Rooms can be reserved by paying a deposit, and payment plans are available. Please contact me for more information and with any questions.


Venue: www.riversidelifestyle.co.uk/



By West Norwood Therapies Team, Jul 6 2019 06:47PM

Massage therapist Melanie Howlett shares some thoughts on how she works as an advanced clinical massage therapist and what you can expect from her treatments



Advanced clinical massage is described as an East meets West approach and style of body work. A toolkit which incorporates the technical aspects of sports massage with a more holistic approach.


This kind of treatment combines Acupressure, Cranial Sacral techniques , Trigger Point Therapy, advanced sports stretching , Myofascial Release and Structural integration techniques alongside relaxation/ energy and meridian rebalancing. Influences which are inspired by a more Eastern approach and style to massage.


This fusion of techniques results in a massage “experience” which is deeply relaxing, stress busting, pain relieving, and anti ageing, often leaving recipients reluctant to leave the massage table.


It’s often not until we get on the treatment table and have a good massage treatment that we realise how much in need of a massage we were.


We often don’t realise how stressed and tired we are or how much tension we are holding in our body until our therapist starts to tune in and address TriggerPoints and adhesions which can often be the cause of undiagnosed musculoskeletal pain or tension headaches, fatigue and stress.


No two treatments are ever the same. As the therapist starts to connect with the soft tissue with and tune into the individual is when the magic happens and for that time spent on the treatment table it is not unusual you may be transported to another dimension.


It can be as if a universe of sensations hidden within the body is discovered that can only be awakened by the therapeutic touch of a good therapist. Relaxing the mind and body and seeking out pain and tension often leaving recipients snoozing and floating in between that place of the conscious and unconscious ( was I or was I not snoring just a little bit ? )

Such a great place to be and deeply relaxing.


However, different approaches can be incorporated depending on what each person is looking for and what is required.


Some sessions may be more technical focusing in on specific areas such as shoulder girdle or hip/lower back addressing specific pain conditions and others more general as a full body treatment with some focus to specific areas.


Some treatments are more fluid and passive and others are more active and dynamic where the recipient is more involved.


Ultimately the aim is to create equilibrium for the body mind and soul, make each person as comfortable as possible and to deliver what is appropriate for each individual at that particular time.


For the best results a course of treatment is recommended to really start to relax and get the accumulative effects of having a course of treatments.
For the best results a course of treatment is recommended to really start to relax and get the accumulative effects of having a course of treatments.

When a specific goal has been reached it is good to have a maintenance treatment every 3 to 4 weeks to check in with your body and to keep in optimum health and well-being preventing stress, overwhelm and injury.


To experience the healing and rejuvenating benefits of what an Advanced Clinical Massage will do for you and your body, mind and soul, please don’t hesitate to book in with Melanie Howlett ACMT @ West Norwood Therapies or get in contact to find out more.

I look forward to embarking on your massage journey with you.





By West Norwood Therapies Team, May 16 2019 09:34AM

Acupuncturist Philippa summers considers the view from her allotment and how this interpretation of nature and environment mirrors Chinese medicine's approach to our bodies.



I have recently found an unexpected place of peace, tranquillity and contemplation in the heart of London. It is particularly beautiful at this time of year, with spring flowers, fruit trees in blossom and song birds in full chorus. Sitting on a hill above the worst of the pollution with spectacular far reaching views across the city, it is a world of discovery and unexpected surprises. Today we found lizards beneath some wooden boards. It’s an allotment, or rather a share of one, which is even better and far more manageable, in a stunning location close to Brockwell Park. I frequently use metaphors of nature, landscape and environment to illustrate the way that Chinese Medicine views the body. Working on the allotment has fuelled those ideas.


The allotment is quite different from my garden. More mess and earth, getting down and dirty in the soil, with plenty of muck involved. I’ve learnt a thing or too already from the other plot holders generously sharing tips on what grows well up there and how to improve the soil. It’s clay, which is rich in minerals but heavy, and by adding well rotted horse manure and straw the texture and drainage is improved. It feels good to look at the soil more closely, feel its texture rich in fat worms, and know the difference it will make to the health of the plants and the taste of the produce if the slugs don’t get there first.


The muck is like eating really good fresh vital food, as opposed to processed foods and vitamin pills, the equivalent of chemical fertilisers. An organic approach to gardening builds strength in the plants naturally so that they withstand pests, akin to having a healthy immune system. Nurturing and nudging health in positive directions through good nutrition, appropriate exercise, adequate rest and relaxation, affects how we feel in body, mind and spirit. Even when it comes to genetics, we now know that how we live influences which genes are switched on and off.


People often ask if acupuncture can help, such and such a condition. Of course, acupuncture is better suited to treating some things than others, but it is the bodily landscape that is at the heart of a Chinese Medical diagnosis and treatment, rather than the condition. The landscape - be it hot, cold, dry, damp, stagnant, depleted, etc - creates the conditions in which certain imbalances are more likely to arise and progress. The disease label is very often not as important as the landscape against which it has arisen. Two people with migraines may have very different types, arising from very different bodily landscapes and they will be treated differently. A landscape that gives rise to stomach pains in one person, may cause anxiety in another and the treatments may be very similar. So the landscape, rather than the disease label, is more important when it comes to treating with acupuncture and often has more influence on how easily a health issue will resolve. By addressing the imbalance people often find that their overall health and wellbeing improve, not just the issue that they sought treatment for.


Chinese Medicine sees the body as an interconnected whole, where every part of the body is interrelated, and each part exerts an influence on the whole. With climate change we can see just how delicately balanced and interdependent the whole planet is. This too is reflected in our small allotment, with its lizards, foxes and insect life. Our bodies are not so different, as an example I think of the influence that a healthy gut biome has on brain function.


I find the Daoist view, where the internal landscape of the body is influenced by the same forces that influence nature, to be enlightening, inspirational and nature is a great teacher, as well as a great healer. We often give priority to nurturing our physical health and we can do the same for our mental health and wellbeing. Being out in nature is a soothing counterbalance to the bustle of city life. I have found that tending the allotment and looking out over the view in quiet contemplation, or while hanging out with friends, is food for mind, body and soul, both literally and metaphorically. I certainly wouldn’t do it for economic reasons – at an hourly minimum wage it probably works out about £100 a spud!





By West Norwood Therapies Team, May 2 2019 11:54AM

Massage therapist and yoga teacher Erika Zettervall shares her experience of Hannah's tai chi workshop and the impact on her life force - and recommends you give it a try.


May the forth be with you: the date 4 May has with a pun transcended into the official Star Wars day.


We might not be able to offer Obi-Wan Kenobi or other Jedi masters nor the use of light sabres at West Norwood Therapies but we do have handle on“the force”and have some powerful therapist and teachers on hand. We can build, tune, direct, gather and strengthen either in class with Hannah (tai chi/qigong) or Emma/Yinka (yoga) or by receiving a treatment with Philippa (acupuncture), Melanie (Reiki) or healing hands from me, Veronica, Tessa or Lauren.


The force, being the Life force energy that animates our physical form and flows through, within and around us always. Known to every wisdom lineage – Prana to the Yogi, Qi to the Chinese Ki to the Japanese – it is this vital force that gives us life and the universe life. When it is directed with conscious intent it brings deeper meaning and wellbeing to our lives and when it is on point and in balance, we often feel “in the flow” and we are only mildly affected by the challenges and difficulties we will ultimately incur. We might feel lifted by some unnamed energy which gives us the grace and support to navigate life. This anonymous energy is your life force.


I have mainly been familiar with the Sanskrit term for primary energy; prana (sometimes translated as breath but, comes from the two Sanskrit words pra - constant and na - motion and means constant motion or constant movement) as yoga has been my thing for about 20 years. Much of my own practice revolves around building and regulating prana. However prior to discovering yoga, I took tai chi classes regularly for about a year. It was my first experience of energy practice and a revolutionary discovery to me. So when Hannah joined us I was keen to revisit the chi, by taking one of Hannah’s workshops to see what I remembered. Not much, is the answer at least not the details. But it was very good and enjoyable.


I understand to be Tai chi is a form of martial art practiced with slow graceful poetically named movements woven together on the breath. Mastering the slow motion movements prepares the fast explosive ones. The slowness allows the brain to register the full range of the movement sequence. Then the explosive swift movements can be precise and efficient, in the same way dancers and rock climbers rehearse moves slowly slowly to the be executed effortless and swiftly later.


Hannah teaches small classes and she moves and teaches like a peaceful warrior with grace, confidence and precision. It’s very accessible and easy to join in but best benefit from a series of regular classes as the graceful poetic movements reaps greatest rewards from many many repetitions.

The chi? Yes it felt very balancing, soothing and revitalising and I may think the force be with me and if you fancy the force be with you and turning into a peaceful warrior, come try Hannah’s tai chi/qi gong.




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